Government Boarding Schools Once Separated Native American Children From Families – HISTORY

Government Boarding Schools Once Separated Native American Children From Families – HISTORY

Source: Government Boarding Schools Once Separated Native American Children From Families – HISTORY

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FDR signs G.I. Bill:

FDR signs G.I. Bill:

On this day in 1944, U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs the G.I. Bill, an unprecedented act of legislation designed to compensate returning members of the armed services–known as G.I.s–for their efforts in World War II.

As the last of its sweeping New Deal reforms, Roosevelt’s administration created the G.I. Bill–officially the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944–hoping to avoid a relapse into the Great Depression after the war ended. FDR particularly wanted to prevent a repeat of the Bonus March of 1932, when 20,000 unemployed veterans and their families flocked in protest to Washington. The American Legion, a veteran’s organization, successfully fought for many of the provisions included in the bill, which gave returning servicemen access to unemployment compensation, low-interest home and business loans, and–most importantly–funding for education.

By giving veterans money for tuition, living expenses, books, supplies and equipment, the G.I. Bill effectively transformed higher education in America. Before the war, college had been an option for only 10-15 percent of young Americans, and university campuses had become known as a haven for the most privileged classes. By 1947, in contrast, vets made up half of the nation’s college enrollment; three years later, nearly 500,000 Americans graduated from college, compared with 160,000 in 1939.

As educational institutions opened their doors to this diverse new group of students, overcrowded classrooms and residences prompted widespread improvement and expansion of university facilities and teaching staffs. An array of new vocational courses were developed across the country, including advanced training in education, agriculture, commerce, mining and fishing–skills that had previously been taught only informally.

The G.I. Bill became one of the major forces that drove an economic expansion in America that lasted 30 years after World War II. Only 20 percent of the money set aside for unemployment compensation under the bill was given out, as most veterans found jobs or pursued higher education. Low interest home loans enabled millions of American families to move out of urban centers and buy or build homes outside the city, changing the face of the suburbs. Over 50 years, the impact of the G.I. Bill was enormous, with 20 million veterans and dependents using the education benefits and 14 million home loans guaranteed, for a total federal investment of $67 billion. Among the millions of Americans who have taken advantage of the bill are former Presidents George H.W. Bush and Gerald Ford, former Vice President Al Gore and entertainers Johnny Cash, Ed McMahon, Paul Newman and Clint Eastwood.

Ephesians 2 King James Version (KJV):

Ephesians 2 King James Version (KJV):

And you hath he quickened, who were dead in trespasses and sins;

Wherein in time past ye walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that now worketh in the children of disobedience:

Among whom also we all had our conversation in times past in the lusts of our flesh, fulfilling the desires of the flesh and of the mind; and were by nature the children of wrath, even as others.

But God, who is rich in mercy, for his great love wherewith he loved us,

Even when we were dead in sins, hath quickened us together with Christ, (by grace ye are saved;)

And hath raised us up together, and made us sit together in heavenly places in Christ Jesus:

That in the ages to come he might shew the exceeding riches of his grace in his kindness toward us through Christ Jesus.

For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God:

Not of works, lest any man should boast.

10 For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them.

11 Wherefore remember, that ye being in time past Gentiles in the flesh, who are called Uncircumcision by that which is called the Circumcision in the flesh made by hands;

12 That at that time ye were without Christ, being aliens from the commonwealth of Israel, and strangers from the covenants of promise, having no hope, and without God in the world:

13 But now in Christ Jesus ye who sometimes were far off are made nigh by the blood of Christ.

14 For he is our peace, who hath made both one, and hath broken down the middle wall of partition between us;

15 Having abolished in his flesh the enmity, even the law of commandments contained in ordinances; for to make in himself of twain one new man, so making peace;

16 And that he might reconcile both unto God in one body by the cross, having slain the enmity thereby:

17 And came and preached peace to you which were afar off, and to them that were nigh.

18 For through him we both have access by one Spirit unto the Father.

19 Now therefore ye are no more strangers and foreigners, but fellowcitizens with the saints, and of the household of God;

20 And are built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Jesus Christ himself being the chief corner stone;

21 In whom all the building fitly framed together groweth unto an holy temple in the Lord:

22 In whom ye also are builded together for an habitation of God through the Spirit.

Some Good News For A Change:

Some Good News For A Change:

1. Town’s oldest resident gets her own birthday parade

Martha Leach is turning 103 on July 6, but the celebration is already underway in Holly Springs, North Carolina. On Wednesday, friends drove Leach to the town fire station, where she was given a tour and a helmet. Then she hopped aboard Fire Engine #1, and was driven around town. People lined the streets, holding up signs and balloons, while Leach activated the siren. “It’s the good Lord’s plan for me to be here,” she told WNCN. Firefighter Adam Godfrey drove Leach around, and asked her for some advice during the ride. “She said live a stress-free life, and enjoy your home and family,” he said. “Always be loved by someone.” Born in 1915 in Wagram, North Carolina, Leach moved to Holly Springs in 1948, and said she enjoys spending time relaxing on her front porch, just “sitting and looking.” [WNCN]

2. Man spends his summer traveling the U.S. and mowing lawns for people in need

Rodney Smith Jr. is making a difference, one lawn at a time. Smith, a 28-year-old native of Bermuda, had just earned his master’s degree in social work when he spotted an elderly man in Huntsville, Alabama, having a hard time mowing his lawn. Smith stopped to help, and “that night, I decided to mow lawns for the elderly, disabled, single moms, and veterans,” he told CNN. He started the Raising Men Lawn Care Service, a foundation that finds people who need their lawns mowed and also inspires kids to give back. Last summer, Smith set off on a journey across the U.S. and mowed lawns in all 50 states. He’s doing it again this year, and has challenged kids to join him by mowing 50 lawns, free of charge, in their hometowns. So far, 12 kids have hit that goal, and each one received their own lawnmower. [CNN]

3. Baltimore couple gets married by pilot on flight home from Vegas

Passengers on a Southwest flight from Las Vegas to Baltimore on Sundaysuddenly found themselves at a wedding. With about 45 minutes left until landing, a passenger named Renee, decked out in a white dress, got up and began walking down the plane aisle to meet her groom, Michael, at the front of the cabin. As the other passengers started to realize what was happening, they pulled out their phones and started recording. The wedding was officiated by the pilot, who used an intercom so everyone could hear what was going on. The pilot announced that the pair met online four years ago, and had Michael promise to take Renee as his “travel companion when I become a Rapid Reward member,” which got laughs from the crowd. [People]

4. Smoking in the U.S. hits an all time low

Fewer Americans are smoking than ever before. New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics put the number of adult smokers in the year 2017 at about 14 percent of the population. The figure was around 16 percent in 2016, and 20 percent back in 2007. This trend points to “a general decline” in the smoking population, NBC News reported. Smoking among high school students is also at a new low. Dr. K. Michael Cummings, an addiction researcher at the Medical University of South Carolina, also noted that sales of cigarettes have fallen in recent years. “Everything is pointed in the right direction,” he said. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, NBC News]

5. Wisconsin neighbors discover they are long-lost sisters

When Dawn Johnson bought a house in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, she had no idea her new neighbors were family. She moved in last June, and quickly met Hillary and Lance Harris and their 5-year-old daughter, Stella. Hillary told The Associated Press that Stella was instantly “so drawn to” Johnson. Hillary was adopted as an infant, and in 2012 received information about her birth parents. She spent years searching for two sisters on her father’s side, including one named Dawn Johnson, but to no avail. When Hillary saw a delivery in the driveway for Dawn, she asked her new neighbor the name of her father, and that’s when she had confirmation it was her sister. The families now celebrate holidays, birthdays, and just normal days together. “I can feel the love,” Hillary said. [The Associated Press]