Roy Moore Will Sign Your Yearbook AND Your Absence Note!

Roy Moore Will Sign Your Yearbook AND Your Absence Note!

(His eyes are like angels but his heart is cold)

So there. In fact, if — let’s be honest, when — more women come forward, it’s not evidence that Moore was a serial creeper on young women; it’s proof that the Washington Post is paying thousands of dollars to women to lie, lie, lie, because that’s exactly how journalism works, you know. Just ask Lenny Jewenstein and he’ll tell you.

And never signed a yearbook after he left high school.

The list of women saying Roy Moore creeped on them 40 years ago just keeps getting longer and longer, as the Washington Post reported last night on two more women, Gena Richardson and Becky Gray, who recalled in detail how Moore hit on them when they worked at the Gadsden Mall in the late ’70s. Yes, that’s in addition to the two women AL.com reported on Wednesday afternoon.

Ms. Richardson, now 58, said that Moore did his 30-year-old Teen Idol act in the fall of 1977, somewhere around her 18th birthday, though she can’t recall whether it was before or after. Richardson was in 12th grade at the time, and working the jewelry and cosmetic counter at Sears, when Moore, then 30, wanted to get to know her better, telling her “You can just call me Roy,” as any friendly assistant district attorney cruising teen girls might. He asked her what school she went to, and then wanted her phone number, but she played hard to get, the little minx, telling him her dad was a preacher and no, he would not approve.

We can only assume from what followed that Moore was the inspiration for Sade’s 1984 hit “Smooth Operator”:

A few days later, she says, she was in trigonometry class at Gadsden High when she was summoned to the principal’s office over the intercom in her classroom. She had a phone call.

“I said ‘Hello?’” Richardson recalls. “And the male on the other line said, ‘Gena, this is Roy Moore.’ I was like, ‘What?!’ He said, ‘What are you doing?’ I said, ‘I’m in trig class.’ ”

Moore then laid on the charm, as one would when talking to any gal who’s taking a call while she’s in her high school’s office.

“At that point, he said, ‘Would you like to go out some time?’ ” recalls Richardson […] “I said, ‘Well, I can’t talk right now.’ And being so naive, and so not worldly, I said, ‘I’ll be at work Friday or Saturday.’”

She “wasn’t so worldly” — that’s the true voice of a real southern woman, and we absolutely believe her. Moore dropped by Sears again that weekend and asked her out. Richardson tried to brush him off, saying, as she had the first time he hit on her, “Look, my dad is so strict.” But Moore persisted, and finally convinced Richardson to go to a late movie with him at the mall’s theater, just as if he were 12 years younger and an appropriate age for her. After the movie, Moore generously offered to drive her to her own car, at which point readers of the WaPo story are all saying, “Oh, god, don’t get in his car.” But she did, and when they got to her car, way off in the back parking lot behind the Sears store, he wanted to sit and chat a while and sweet Christ, girls in 1977 didn’t even have pepper spray, did they?

“I just explained to him that my dad’s a minister, and you know, I just can’t sneak around because that’s wrong,” she recalls. “So I thanked him and started to get out and he grabbed me and pulled me in and that’s when he kissed me.

“It was a man kiss — like really deep tongue. Like very forceful tongue. It was a surprise. I’d never been kissed like that,” she says. “And the minute that happened, I got scared then. I really did. Something came over me that scared me. And so I said, ‘I’ve got to go, because my curfew is now.’ ”

That definitely sounds like a guy who would go on to say The Gays threaten families. Richardson told Kayla McLaughlin, her friend and co-worker at Sears, all about Moore’s weird advances as they happened, and McLaughlin recalls telling her, “You can’t go out with him. He’s old.” McLaughlin says she felt protective of Richardson, who was a preacher’s kid and “a little naive.” After Richardson told McLaughlin about the incident in the car, McLaughlin would warn her whenever Moore came into the mall with his mind on a-courtin’:

“I would call and say he’s coming this way,” McLaughlin says. “She would go to the back. She was uncomfortable.”

If you’re wondering about Richardson’s politics, she says she’s a moderate Republican and that she didn’t vote at all in 2016 or in Alabama’s Senate primary. Obviously on the George Soros payroll.

WaPo also spoke to Phyllis Smith, who wasn’t accosted by Moore but said he was a Known Problem at the clothing store where she worked, a place that catered to young women and at least one older fella who thought he’d find ripe pickin’s there. She said the teen girls in the store told each other to “just make yourself scarce when Roy’s in here, he’s just here to bother you, don’t pay attention to him and he’ll go away.” WaPo reporters found a dozen people who recalled seeing Moore at the mall in the late ’70s and early ’80s, and who remembered Moore as

a frequent presence — a well-dressed man walking around alone, leaning on counters, spending enough time in the stores, especially on weekend nights, that some of the young women who worked there said they became uncomfortable.

Smith recalled the dashing young assistant DA’s visits to the store, where, if he was checking out the merchandise, it was definitely not clothing or accessories if you know what we mean:

“I can remember him walking in and the whole mood would change with us girls,” says Smith, 59, who lives in Gadsden and says she is a Democrat. “It would be like we were on guard. I would find something else to do. I remember being creeped out.”

He sounds nice. Oh, but she’s a Democrat, which means she was obviously lying, please ignore.

The other woman who said she had to fend off Moore’s Lady’s Man act is Becky Gray, who worked at the Pizitz department store, which anchored the other end of the mall from Sears. She was 22 in 1977, and even though she was probably a bit on the ancient side for Moore’s tastes at the time, he apparently thought she’d do:

“Parents would drop kids off, let them roam the mall. Well, he started coming up to me.”

She says Moore kept asking her out and she kept saying no.

“I’d always say no, I’m dating someone, no, I’m in a relationship,” says Gray, now 62, a retired teacher and a Democrat who supports Moore’s opponent in the Senate race. “I thought he was old at that time. Anyone over 22 was just old.”

Another Democrat? OK, the rest of the story is now “Blah blah blah Moore, blah blah blah Whatever.” If you’re still bothering to read, we also learn that Moore made a habit of hovering around Gray in the men’s section where she worked, or near the restrooms, and that was not cool with her:

she became so disturbed that she complained to the Pizitz manager, Maynard von Spiegelfeld. Gray says he told her that it was “not the first time he had a complaint about him hanging out at the mall.”

Mr. Von Spiegelfeld is no longer among the living, but the consensus in the Wonkette Sekrit Chatcave is that we ALL want to be known as “Maynard von Spiegelfeld” from this day forward.

The Moore campaign didn’t even bother commenting on the latest allegations, because obviously all these women — and the people who corroborated their accounts — are liberal agents of Satan trying to bring down a righteous man, duh. A spokesperson issued a statement explaining this obvious fact:

“If you are a liberal and hate Judge Moore, apparently he groped you,” the statement said. “If you are a conservative and love Judge Moore, you know these allegations are a political farce.”

So there. In fact, if — let’s be honest, when — more women come forward, it’s not evidence that Moore was a serial creeper on young women; it’s proof that the Washington Post is paying thousands of dollars to women to lie, lie, lie, because that’s exactly how journalism works, you know. Just ask Lenny Jewenstein and he’ll tell you.

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